Baltidome Blog | Baltimore Green News


Baltimore Adopt A Lot Program

Baltimore Adopt A Lot Program

It is cold and dreary outside, but in just a few months it won’t be, so now’s the perfect time to start planning your garden.  Don’t have a front or back yard? -No problem, with Baltimore’s Adopt A Lot program you can have your very own green space too!

The Adopt A Lot program helps Baltimore residents identify empty lots and transform them into a community oasis.  The website of Baltimore Green Space, a land trust for community-managed open spaces, is a great place to start for residents interested in gathering information about adopting a city green space.  Baltimore Green Space, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, was founded in 2007 by a group of community gardeners who wanted to see their communities’ treasured open spaces remain available to residents.

Another good source of info is the city’s Turn A Vacant Lot Into A Garden guide.  You can download a PDF version of the guide: CLICK HERE.



Update From The New Community Garden In Hampden

Update From The New Community Garden In Hampden

From the “Ash Street Garden” in Hampden:

Cleaning was the name of the game this week! With spring just around the corner, we’re clearing the last of the trash and debris from the properties and are negotiating a dumpster to be dropped off on Saturday the 6th. The dumpster will only be available until Monday morning so let’s fill it up fast! In addition, our seeds have been ordered and we’re preparing to start planting seedlings in the greenhouse as soon as possible.

In an effort to make our presence known, we’ve started the first phase of the “Ash Street Garden” mural. The text is finished and now we’re in need of more artists to help plan and execute the rest of the project. Any artists interested in helping out with the mural should contact Allison.

Wishlist
● Dixie Cups Once again, I would like thank all of
● 5-gallon buckets with lids our volunteers for your hard work
● Bread shipping creates and contributions to the garden.
● Work gloves We count on your continued support
● Soil

CONTACT: thefreefarm@gmail.com

For a guide on how to turn a vacant lot into a garden from the Baltimore Office of Sustainability, CLICK HERE.

To learn more about the origins of the Ash Street Garden in Hampden, CLICK HERE.



New Community Garden Gets Started Hampden

New Community Garden In The Works In Hampden

Baltimore native Billy Thomas has recently acquired several vacant lots on Ash and Baldwin Streets in Hampden through the Baltimore City Adopt-A-Lot program.  The Adopt-A-Lot program, established by the Baltimore Department of Public Works, allows community groups to adopt City-owned land and use it for community space.  Billy is working on creating a community garden space which he envisions as a “huge punk veggie garden”.

There will be a meeting this Sunday, January 24 at 3515 Ash Street from 11-4pm to discuss plans, get input and get involved. If you would like to be involved, but can not attend the meeting, contact Billy at monumentalconstruction@hotmail.com.

Kat Feuerstein, the Clean and Green Committee Chair in Hampden, is encouraging residents with items such as seeds, starters, soil, tools, etc. that they can contribute, to please contact Billy to make donations.  She says, “For those of you who are not familiar with this lot, it resembled a landfill before they arrived”.

As of last year Baltimore had 7,000 lots of various shapes and sizes available for the Adopt-A-Lot program. To obtain more information on the program, call 443-984-3961

For a guide on how to turn a vacant lot into a garden from the Baltimore Office of Sustainability, CLICK HERE.



Baltimore Approves Plan To Allow Residents To Claim Vacant Lots

Start A Green Space In Baltimore City

Baltimore Approves Plan To Allow Residents To Claim Vacant Lots

According to an article in the Baltimore Sun, “Under a plan approved by the city’s spending board yesterday, community groups that nurture a vacant lot for five years will be able to form a land trust to buy the plot for a nominal fee from the city.”

The program was initiated by Baltimore Green Space.  Baltimore Green Space was founded in 2007 by a group of community gardeners who wanted to see their communities’ treasured open spaces remain available to residents.   By working in collaboration with the Office of Sustainability, the group developed criteria for identifying appropriate lots and a process for the City to transfer the community-managed property to a land trust.

From the Baltimore Sun:

Residents who wish to purchase a site from the city must create a nonprofit organization and demonstrate that the land is being used for a fruit and vegetable garden, play area, neighborhood gathering space or in some way enhancing the community, under the plan approved by the Board of Estimates. If the land belongs to an absentee landlord, the city will attempt to acquire it through tax-sale foreclosure and sell it to the community group.

For the full article from the Sun, CLICK HERE.

For more information about starting a green space in Baltimore City, CLICK HERE.