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Proposed Baltimore Walmart Complex – Progress or Problem?

Proposed Baltimore Walmart Complex – Progress or Problem?

Bmore Local is a Baltimore coalition of residents, business owners and community leaders that is working hard to keep folks informed about the proposed 25th Street Station Walmart development in Remington.  Watch the revealing video to learn more about the next proclaimed “green building” scheme and the developers who are making a pitch for property in downtown Baltimore.

To get involved with Bmore Local, visit BmoreLocal.net.

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Remington Walmart Traffic Study Is Out- The Search For Missing Cars Begins

Remington 25th Street Station Traffic Study Released- The Search For Missing Cars Begins

The ‘Draft’ Traffic Impact Study (TIS) for the proposed 25th Street Station big box development project in Remington was recently released and area residents are raising a lot of concerns.  The most intriguing of which might be -What’s the deal with the missing cars?

On the new site EXIT 6, a campaign initiated by residents of Remington to deal with issues raised from the proposed 25th Street Station development and traffic, the question is asked, “Who can solve this mystery?The Lost Cars of Huntingdon Avenue”.

Apparently, according to the study, cars entering the area via Huntingdon Avenue actually disappear, rather than accumulate, making it something akin to the Bermuda Triangle.  Recent posts on the EXIT 6 site related to the missing cars and other concerns provide interesting commentary on the study.  To check out EXIT 6, CLICK HERE.

Other community issues that have been raised about the traffic study include the observation that no dates and times of car counts are provided, the unsubstantiated assumption that 25% of shoppers will walk, bike, or take the bus to the site, the lack of projections for rush hour, Saturdays and holidays and the fact that the information is inconsistent with other Baltimore area Lowes and Walmart stores.

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Post Update: In an analysis of the traffic study done by the Mobtown Shank, it is reported that traffic will increase 129 times from what it is now in the area on weekends.  For more information, CLICK HERE.

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Wal-Mart Project Developers Would Demolish 19th Century Church

Wal-mart Project Developers Would Demolish 19th Century Church

Despite repeated pleas by Remington community members, the former Royer’s Hill Methodist Episcopal Church will not be saved if WV Urban Development has its way.  You wouldn’t know it though, by looking at current designs for the development, which show a church-like structure at it’s location.

The viable 19th century stone building, which would likely far outlast any new structure built at the site under natural forces, is located at the corner of 24th and Sisson Streets and is currently being used as a storage space.  In February, Baltimore Hertage, a citywide, nonprofit historic and architectural preservation organization, came out in solidarity with residents and stated on their blog that the church “should be preserved and utilized to help establish a successful transition between the large commercial development and the historic residential Remington neighborhood”.

The developers of the proposed 25th Street Station apparently lack the creativity to incorporate the building into their ground plan and continue with their intention to demolish the church as they are gearing to present the project to the City Council.  In last week’s meeting with residents, a member of the WV Urban Development team explained that the building “can not be saved” and in exchange they are considering creating a facade in the form of the church in order “to maintain the original character of the corner”, which is the church-like configuration rendered in the current plan.

The bulldozing of the church raises further questions about the developer’s ability to respectfully reconcile community concerns about the controversial development.  A rally is being held Monday at City Hall at 4pm before the anticipated introduction of the Planned Unit Development (PUD) for the development by City Council Member Belinda Conaway to the Baltimore City Council.  Community members who are concerned about the development are encouraged to attend the rally, which is organized by Bmore Local, and urge City Council not to approve the PUD unless certain demands by the community are met.[tweetmeme http://www.URL.com]



Vote On The 24hr Wal-Mart Store Proposed For Remington

The Baltimore Sun Is Asking For Your Vote On The 24hr Wal-Mart Proposed For Remington

Cities in Japan such as Tokyo and Kyoto have recently proposed policy plans to request 24-hour businesses to cut hours in a bid to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.  Earlier this year the Environment Agency, the UK’s equivalent to our Environmental Protection Agency, introduced rules forcing businesses to switch off lights and displays at night to meet new carbon reduction limits.  Here in Baltimore, however, the latest wannabe green project, 25th Street Station, is inserting into a PUD (Planned Unit Development) a request for 24-hour operations at the site.  The developers are requesting that the PUD be submitted Monday, April 19th to the Baltimore City Council.  You be the judge for what is best for a sustainable Baltimore.

CLICK HERE  to check out the Baltimore Sun Article, 24-hour Walmart in Baltimore: should city officials allow it? -and vote!

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Email your thoughts to Belinda Conaway, the Baltimore City Council Member who would be submitting the PUD: Belinda.Conaway@baltimorecity.gov

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25th Street Station PUD Hearing

Latest On The 25th Street Station PUD Hearing

In regards to the previous post:
Walmart & 25th Street Station Update

Councilwoman Belinda Conaway has announced that the PUD has been delayed at the developer’s request.  The new hearing is scheduled for April 19th, 2010.

Baltimore City Council Legistlative Calendar:
Monday, April 19, 2010
City Council Meeting
5:00 PM Du Burns Council Chamber, 4th floor, City Hall

MAP IT
City Council meetings are open to the public.

For more information about the delay, CLICK HERE to read today’s article in the Baltimore Sun.